sales@mediastorehouse.co.uk
Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 
Home > Molecules

Molecules

Choose from 116 pictures in our Molecules collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Molecules Print

Molecular Model Fumaric Acid Trans Config

Molecular Model of the Smallest Dicarboxylic Acid in Trans Configuration. Bonds are Superimposed on the Gray Carbon Atoms. Oxygen: Red. Hydrogen: Cyan Molecular Model Fumaric Acid Trans Config

© Custom Medical Stock Photo

Molecular Model Smallest Dicarboxylic Acid Trans Configuration

Featured Molecules Print

Molecular Model Malathion Insecticide

C Gray O Red s Yellow H Cyan Molecular Model Malathion Insecticide

© Custom Medical Stock Photo

C Gray O Reds Yellow H Cyan Molecular Model Malathion Insectic, C Gray O Reds Yellow H Cyan Molecular Model Malathion Insecticide

Featured Molecules Print

Ergotamine molecuilar model

Ergotamine molecuilar model
Carbon: Mauve; Hydrogen: orange; Nitrogen: dark green; Oxygen: light green
Ergotamine is an ergopeptine and part of the ergot family of alkaloids; it is structurally and biochemically closely related to ergoline. It possesses structural similarity to several neurotransmitters, and has biological activity as a vasoconstrictor. It is used medicinally for the treatment of acute migraine attacks (sometimes in combination with caffeine), and to induce childbirth and prevent post-partum haemorrhage. It was first isolated from the ergot fungus Claviceps purpurea by Arthur Stoll at Sandoz in 1918 and marketed as Gynergen in 1921. The ergotamine molecule shares structural similarity with neurotransmitters such as serotonin, dopamine, and epinephrine and can thus bind to several receptors acting as an agonist.
Ergotamine is a precursor of LSD and produces vasoconstriction peripherally as well as damages the peripheral epithelium. In high doses, ergotamine may produce vascular stasis, thrombosis, and gangrene. It can increase uterine contractivity and occasionally is used therapeutically immediately post-partum to decrease uterine bleeding. Contraindications include: atherosclerosis, Buerger's syndrome, coronary artery disease, hepatic disease, pregnancy, pruritus, Raynaud's syndrome, and renal disease. Ergotamine continues to be prescribed for migraines.
Ergotamine molecuilar model
Carbon: Mauve; Hydrogen: orange; Nitrogen: dark green; Oxygen: light green
Ergotamine is an ergopeptine and part of the ergot family of alkaloids; it is structurally and biochemically closely related to ergoline. It possesses structural similarity to several neurotransmitters, and has biological activity as a vasoconstrictor. It is used medicinally for the treatment of acute migraine attacks (sometimes in combination with caffeine), and to induce childbirth and prevent post-partum haemorrhage. It was first isolated from the ergot fungus Claviceps purpurea by Arthur Stoll at Sandoz in 1918 and marketed as Gynergen in 1921. The ergotamine molecule shares structural similarity with neurotransmitters such as serotonin, dopamine, and epinephrine and can thus bind to several receptors acting as an agonist.
Ergotamine is a precursor of LSD and produces vasoconstriction peripherally as well as damages the peripheral epithelium. In high doses, ergotamine may produce vascular stasis, thrombosis, and gangrene. It can increase uterine contractivity and occasionally is used therapeutically immediately post-partum to decrease uterine bleeding. Contraindications include: atherosclerosis, Buerger's syndrome, coronary artery disease, hepatic disease, pregnancy, pruritus, Raynaud's syndrome, and renal disease. Ergotamine continues to be prescribed for migraines.

© Custom Medical Stock Photo